• 28 FEB 20

    Can cutting colour and cartoons make a difference?

    Cleverly thought-out marketing is everywhere. Indeed, visit the local supermarket and you’ll instantly be assaulted by happy characters leering down from cereal boxes and see bright, eye-catching colours adorning packets of sugary snacks.

    Of course, this is the point. Effective marketing of products is all about knowing how to make them appeal to target audiences, and this is why sweets, sugary cereals, crisps and other unhealthy snacks are made to stand out from the shelves in a way that appeals to children.

    When research tested what colours certain age groups are drawn to, it found that young children are especially attracted to bright, vibrant colours.[i] As children use colour as a fundamental way to understand their surrounding environment, it makes sense that bold colours that give a definite sense of form and object are likely to appeal. This preference for vibrancy continues throughout childhood, and it is namely this that has made these bright colours such a mainstay in toy designs, children’s clothing and food and drinks aimed towards this market. Often, food and drinks aimed at young children take advertising a step further by creating a mascot or cartoon character as another way to appeal to this younger audience.

    So, if these foods and drinks are so heavily marketed towards children in this manner, could we make a difference by changing the way they look in an effort to help improve oral health?

    Supermarket giant Lidl has recently announced that it is going to remove cartoon characters from own brand cereal boxes in an attempt to make them less appealing. Stating the move is to lessen the effect of “pester power” (when children beg for something they want) this is a step towards encouraging parents/guardians to make healthier choices when shopping.[ii]

    But will this make a difference? I’m on the fence about this. On one hand, it’s great that retail giants are trying to change things by implementing this in the first place. However, we have to realise that Lidl is only removing mascots from their own brand cereals, meaning that all other brands are perfectly able to keep luring children’s attention with whimsical giraffes and other fun characters. Furthermore, we have to also recognise that this is just a drop in the ocean when it comes to unhealthy foods – yes, cereals are especially bad for sugar content, but what about sweets and fruit juices and other ridiculously sugary consumables?

    In the end, it’s a positive change and if it does have a significant impact then we should definitely urge companies to start thinking of more neutral packaging for foods. However, these companies are definitely under no obligation to do so, and if the advertising is working and drawing in the money, why would they change? What it needs to come down to is more regulations about how unhealthy food can be marketed. Who knows whether this is achievable – but it is definitely something to bear in mind for the future.

     

    For further information please call EndoCare on 020 7224 0999

    [i] Sciencing. How Do Bright Colours Appeal to Kids? Link: https://sciencing.com/do-bright-colors-appeal-kids-5476948.html [Last accessed February 2020].

    [ii] The Guardian. Childhood Obesity: Lidl to Remove Cartoon Characters from Cereal Boxes. Link: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/03/childhood-obesity-lidl-remove-cartoon-characters-cereal [Last accessed February 2020].

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Patient Testimonials

Thank you very much for the wonderful work you did for me. I can smile again!

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Zita Drew
Thankyou so much for once again saving a difficult tooth!!  Another thankyou is due to you for your gift to my daughter of the recipe book written by your aunt. Noelle returned to Dubai with the book firmly tucked under her arm. She returns in July for the summer and ...

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Sheila Ferris
Thank you for treating my dental pain, it was a great relief! Thank you also for the care I received while visiting your practice.

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Fraser Gray
I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you and Mr. Sultan for the excellent patient care I received last week. My reluctance to proceed with the surgical treatment was apparent, but with your advice and reassurance, I am sure that I made the right decision. The procedure, though ...

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Anne
This is just to thank you for the root-canal treatment which you carried out on my tooth last Tuesday afternoon. All has now settled down and I can chew on the tooth as normal. I think that we both had a tough ninety minutes last Tuesday but for me it ...

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David Thomson
Just to say thanks for the coffees & friendly, supportive chats. You certainly helped to take the edge off a stressful time for us.

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Rod & Sue Witheridge
Just a quick but BIG thank you all for making what was a frightening and miserable procedure into an experience I could hanle. If there had been more people like you all, I would have a much healthier mouth. It was a pleasure meeting you and your kindness is much ...

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Georgia F
Thank you so much for looking after our nanny Noelia! Thank you also for offering her such a generous discount for your excellent treatment. She asked me to pass on her thanks also. With best wishes.

Read More

Quentin McCoach

Our Clinic Locations

map1

Harley Street Root Canal Clinic
99 Harley Street
London
W1G 6AQ

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0207 224 0999
Email us: CLICK HERE

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Richmond Root Canal Clinic
4-6 George Street
Richmond
Surrey TW9 1JY

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0208 912 1340
Email us: CLICK HERE

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  • Root Canal Treatment

    You may require root canal treatment if you have pain or swelling associalted with your teeth.

  • Root Canal Re-Treatment

    We can help if you are having problems with teeth previously root canal treated by other dentists.

  • Endodontic Microsurgery

    Using the latest surgical techniques we help save teeth even if root canal treatment is not possible.

    • 28 FEB 20

    Can cutting colour and cartoons make a difference?

    Cleverly thought-out marketing is everywhere. Indeed, visit the local supermarket and you’ll instantly be assaulted by happy characters leering down from cereal boxes and see bright, eye-catching colours adorning packets of sugary snacks.

    Of course, this is the point. Effective marketing of products is all about knowing how to make them appeal to target audiences, and this is why sweets, sugary cereals, crisps and other unhealthy snacks are made to stand out from the shelves in a way that appeals to children.

    When research tested what colours certain age groups are drawn to, it found that young children are especially attracted to bright, vibrant colours.[i] As children use colour as a fundamental way to understand their surrounding environment, it makes sense that bold colours that give a definite sense of form and object are likely to appeal. This preference for vibrancy continues throughout childhood, and it is namely this that has made these bright colours such a mainstay in toy designs, children’s clothing and food and drinks aimed towards this market. Often, food and drinks aimed at young children take advertising a step further by creating a mascot or cartoon character as another way to appeal to this younger audience.

    So, if these foods and drinks are so heavily marketed towards children in this manner, could we make a difference by changing the way they look in an effort to help improve oral health?

    Supermarket giant Lidl has recently announced that it is going to remove cartoon characters from own brand cereal boxes in an attempt to make them less appealing. Stating the move is to lessen the effect of “pester power” (when children beg for something they want) this is a step towards encouraging parents/guardians to make healthier choices when shopping.[ii]

    But will this make a difference? I’m on the fence about this. On one hand, it’s great that retail giants are trying to change things by implementing this in the first place. However, we have to realise that Lidl is only removing mascots from their own brand cereals, meaning that all other brands are perfectly able to keep luring children’s attention with whimsical giraffes and other fun characters. Furthermore, we have to also recognise that this is just a drop in the ocean when it comes to unhealthy foods – yes, cereals are especially bad for sugar content, but what about sweets and fruit juices and other ridiculously sugary consumables?

    In the end, it’s a positive change and if it does have a significant impact then we should definitely urge companies to start thinking of more neutral packaging for foods. However, these companies are definitely under no obligation to do so, and if the advertising is working and drawing in the money, why would they change? What it needs to come down to is more regulations about how unhealthy food can be marketed. Who knows whether this is achievable – but it is definitely something to bear in mind for the future.

     

    For further information please call EndoCare on 020 7224 0999

    [i] Sciencing. How Do Bright Colours Appeal to Kids? Link: https://sciencing.com/do-bright-colors-appeal-kids-5476948.html [Last accessed February 2020].

    [ii] The Guardian. Childhood Obesity: Lidl to Remove Cartoon Characters from Cereal Boxes. Link: https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/03/childhood-obesity-lidl-remove-cartoon-characters-cereal [Last accessed February 2020].