• 22 FEB 19

    Berries: friend or foe?

    In recent years we’ve been fed a lot of conflicting information about diet, food and what we need to consume in order to live a healthy lifestyle. Sugar, especially in the shadow of the recently introduced sugar tax, has now become enemy number one. Whilst this is, in my opinion, the right way forward in many scenarios, what we mustn’t forget is that not all sugars are created equal.

    What I am referring to, of course, is the difference between natural and added sugars. Natural sugars occur in produce such as fruits and vegetables, whilst added sugars are pumped into products such as fizzy drinks, sweets and crisps to give them a sweeter flavour.

    So should we be vilifying foods that contain natural sugars as well? The case really goes two ways. On one hand, it is true that all sugars are damaging to our teeth. Even natural sugars such as fructose change the pH of our mouths and make them more acidic, encouraging decay.[i] This is further substantiated by research that found that by drinking water with even a slice of lemon in it, as well as fruit teas and fruit juices could considerably heighten the chances of tooth decay.[ii]

    But does this mean that we should avoid sugary fruits like berries entirely if we want to preserve our teeth? According to new research carried out by the Oral Health Foundation, berries should still be on the menu.

    Scientists have found that berries such as cranberries and blueberries contain polyphenols – natural compounds that help to fend off harmful oral bacteria.[iii] These compounds combat the build up of plaque by helping prevent the bacteria stick to teeth and gums.  Cranberries have been found to be especially beneficial, as even after they have been eaten the polyphenols in them stay in our saliva, offering lasting benefit.

    In light of this research it’s clear to see that to get the benefits of berries in our diet it’s important to exercise moderation. By eating a handful of cranberries you’re likely to be doing your teeth good rather than harm – but these berries still contain 4 grams of natural sugar, so it’s important to keep an eye out on your recommended daily allowances and not exceed these. By striking this balance you can help save your teeth from decay and reap the rewards of the antioxidants, fibre and other nutritional value that these delicious fruits provide.

    For further information please call EndoCare on 020 7224 0999

    [i] EBPCOOH. Fruit – Can It Harm your Teeth? Link: https://ebpcooh.org.uk/fruit-can-harm-teeth/ [Last accessed January 19].

    [ii] BBC News. Sipping Acidic Fruit Tea Wears Away The Enamel, Study Finds. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-43141587 [Last accessed January 19].

    [iii] Oral Health Foundation. Cranberries and Blueberries – Why Certain Fruit Extracts Could Provide The Key To Fighting Tooth Decay. Link: https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/cranberries-and-blueberries-why-certain-fruit-extracts-could-provide-the-key-to-fighting-tooth-decay [Last accessed January 19].

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Patient Testimonials

Thank you so much for looking after our nanny Noelia! Thank you also for offering her such a generous discount for your excellent treatment. She asked me to pass on her thanks also. With best wishes.

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Quentin McCoach
Just a quick but BIG thank you all for making what was a frightening and miserable procedure into an experience I could hanle. If there had been more people like you all, I would have a much healthier mouth. It was a pleasure meeting you and your kindness is much ...

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Georgia F
This is just to thank you for the root-canal treatment which you carried out on my tooth last Tuesday afternoon. All has now settled down and I can chew on the tooth as normal. I think that we both had a tough ninety minutes last Tuesday but for me it ...

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David Thomson
I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you and Mr. Sultan for the excellent patient care I received last week. My reluctance to proceed with the surgical treatment was apparent, but with your advice and reassurance, I am sure that I made the right decision. The procedure, though ...

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Anne
Thank you for treating my dental pain, it was a great relief! Thank you also for the care I received while visiting your practice.

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Fraser Gray
Thank you very much for the wonderful work you did for me. I can smile again!

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Zita Drew
Just to say thanks for the coffees & friendly, supportive chats. You certainly helped to take the edge off a stressful time for us.

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Rod & Sue Witheridge
Thankyou so much for once again saving a difficult tooth!!  Another thankyou is due to you for your gift to my daughter of the recipe book written by your aunt. Noelle returned to Dubai with the book firmly tucked under her arm. She returns in July for the summer and ...

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Sheila Ferris

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Harley Street Root Canal Clinic
99 Harley Street
London
W1G 6AQ

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0207 224 0999
Email us: CLICK HERE

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Richmond Root Canal Clinic
4-6 George Street
Richmond
Surrey TW9 1JY

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0208 912 1340
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  • Root Canal Treatment

    You may require root canal treatment if you have pain or swelling associalted with your teeth.

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    Using the latest surgical techniques we help save teeth even if root canal treatment is not possible.

    • 22 FEB 19

    Berries: friend or foe?

    In recent years we’ve been fed a lot of conflicting information about diet, food and what we need to consume in order to live a healthy lifestyle. Sugar, especially in the shadow of the recently introduced sugar tax, has now become enemy number one. Whilst this is, in my opinion, the right way forward in many scenarios, what we mustn’t forget is that not all sugars are created equal.

    What I am referring to, of course, is the difference between natural and added sugars. Natural sugars occur in produce such as fruits and vegetables, whilst added sugars are pumped into products such as fizzy drinks, sweets and crisps to give them a sweeter flavour.

    So should we be vilifying foods that contain natural sugars as well? The case really goes two ways. On one hand, it is true that all sugars are damaging to our teeth. Even natural sugars such as fructose change the pH of our mouths and make them more acidic, encouraging decay.[i] This is further substantiated by research that found that by drinking water with even a slice of lemon in it, as well as fruit teas and fruit juices could considerably heighten the chances of tooth decay.[ii]

    But does this mean that we should avoid sugary fruits like berries entirely if we want to preserve our teeth? According to new research carried out by the Oral Health Foundation, berries should still be on the menu.

    Scientists have found that berries such as cranberries and blueberries contain polyphenols – natural compounds that help to fend off harmful oral bacteria.[iii] These compounds combat the build up of plaque by helping prevent the bacteria stick to teeth and gums.  Cranberries have been found to be especially beneficial, as even after they have been eaten the polyphenols in them stay in our saliva, offering lasting benefit.

    In light of this research it’s clear to see that to get the benefits of berries in our diet it’s important to exercise moderation. By eating a handful of cranberries you’re likely to be doing your teeth good rather than harm – but these berries still contain 4 grams of natural sugar, so it’s important to keep an eye out on your recommended daily allowances and not exceed these. By striking this balance you can help save your teeth from decay and reap the rewards of the antioxidants, fibre and other nutritional value that these delicious fruits provide.

    For further information please call EndoCare on 020 7224 0999

    [i] EBPCOOH. Fruit – Can It Harm your Teeth? Link: https://ebpcooh.org.uk/fruit-can-harm-teeth/ [Last accessed January 19].

    [ii] BBC News. Sipping Acidic Fruit Tea Wears Away The Enamel, Study Finds. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-43141587 [Last accessed January 19].

    [iii] Oral Health Foundation. Cranberries and Blueberries – Why Certain Fruit Extracts Could Provide The Key To Fighting Tooth Decay. Link: https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/cranberries-and-blueberries-why-certain-fruit-extracts-could-provide-the-key-to-fighting-tooth-decay [Last accessed January 19].