• 30 JAN 20

    Going vegan: good for the planet, bad for your teeth?

    If there’s one lifestyle trend that has really taken off in the past few years, it’s veganism. In fact, it’s now estimated that as many as 600,000 people in the UK are following the vegan diet.[i]

    One way that many people get into veganism is by starting with a monthly challenge, such as the increasingly popular Veganuary. First conceived in 2014, this challenge encourages people to become vegan for the month of January, eschewing all meat and animal products in order to lead a healthier lifestyle and cut down their individual impact on the environment and animal life. Since its inception, this movement has inspired more than half a million people to adopt a vegan lifestyle and helped campaign for better vegan options in restaurants and shops to cater for this lifestyle change.[ii]

    In many ways this change makes perfect sense. From an animal cruelty perspective, a meat and animal product inclusive diet is pretty damning, and there are plenty of UK farming practices that don’t put the welfare of the animals first.[iii] The global farming industry is also decidedly detrimental to our environment in some ways (although in the UK it is much better than many other countries), and that’s not even to mention the carbon footprint left by transporting goods and shipping them overseas. There are also some proven health benefits of becoming vegan, namely that those who adopt this style of diet tend to cut out unhealthier food high in fat and sugar and concentrate instead on eating healthy foods such as fresh vegetables and grains. This means they are less likely to be overweight, and therefore escape the increased chances of developing diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and diabetes.[iv]

    However, for all of these benefits, a vegan diet can also cause issues. Research states that in some instances vegan diets could actually encourage higher rates of tooth decay.[v] This is primarily because people following these diets are likely to not consume as much calcium as people who drink milk or eat cheese, and this can quickly lead to teeth having lower defence against plaque acids. Furthermore, a number of prominent foods in the vegan diet are starchy or acidic (grains, fresh fruit) and these can also encourage decay when eaten too regularly.

    As such, it’s important to consider all aspects of your health if you are looking to change your diet in the New Year. There are vegan foods which are high in calcium, including calcium-set tofu, green leafy vegetables and certain seeds – these should be incorporated into the diet to make up any potential calcium deficiency. It’s also a good idea to continue to watch sugar intake –it’s worth noting that some vegan alternative foods and drink for meat and dairy products can have high sugar content or even more calories, such as the sweetened almond milk used by many coffee shops.

    In the end, going vegan is a big choice to make, and you need to ensure that you are making the decision forearmed with knowledge. By exploring healthy ways to incorporate essential nutrients into your diet, there’s no reason that cutting meat and animal products will have a detrimental effect, especially on your dental health. However, it’s something that needs to be considered before making the change.


    [i] The Vegan Society. Statistics. Link: https://www.vegansociety.com/news/media/statistics [Last accessed January 2020].

    [ii] Veganuary. Join the New Years Resolution. Link: https://uk.veganuary.com/ [Last accessed January 2020].

    [iii] The Vegan Society. Statistics. Link: https://www.vegansociety.com/news/media/statistics [Last accessed January 2020].

    [iv] Bupa. Is Going Vegan Good For You? Link: https://www.bupa.co.uk/newsroom/ourviews/veganism-health-fad [Last accessed January 2020].

    [v] The Daily Mail. How A Vegan Diet Can Lead to Tooth Decay. Link: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7541013/Vegan-diet-lead-tooth-decay-warns-leading-dentist.html [Last accessed January 2020].

Endocare Root Canal Specialist London - Embarrassing Bodies

Click on the link above to see what happened when we were invited by Channel 4’s Embarrassing Bodies to treat a patient who was suffering from an extreme case of  teeth grinding.

ENdocare Welcome Video

Click on the link above to watch an overview of what we do and to learn more about EndoCare.

Weekend Opening

We are now open on Weekends. If you need to see a Root Canal Dentist on Saturday or Sunday then we are now open. For details of our new weekend opening hours please contact us now.

Patient Testimonials

Thankyou so much for once again saving a difficult tooth!!  Another thankyou is due to you for your gift to my daughter of the recipe book written by your aunt. Noelle returned to Dubai with the book firmly tucked under her arm. She returns in July for the summer and ...

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Sheila Ferris
Just to say thanks for the coffees & friendly, supportive chats. You certainly helped to take the edge off a stressful time for us.

Read More

Rod & Sue Witheridge
Just a quick but BIG thank you all for making what was a frightening and miserable procedure into an experience I could hanle. If there had been more people like you all, I would have a much healthier mouth. It was a pleasure meeting you and your kindness is much ...

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Georgia F
Thank you so much for looking after our nanny Noelia! Thank you also for offering her such a generous discount for your excellent treatment. She asked me to pass on her thanks also. With best wishes.

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Quentin McCoach
Thank you very much for the wonderful work you did for me. I can smile again!

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Zita Drew
I just wanted to take this opportunity to thank you and Mr. Sultan for the excellent patient care I received last week. My reluctance to proceed with the surgical treatment was apparent, but with your advice and reassurance, I am sure that I made the right decision. The procedure, though ...

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Anne
Thank you for treating my dental pain, it was a great relief! Thank you also for the care I received while visiting your practice.

Read More

Fraser Gray
This is just to thank you for the root-canal treatment which you carried out on my tooth last Tuesday afternoon. All has now settled down and I can chew on the tooth as normal. I think that we both had a tough ninety minutes last Tuesday but for me it ...

Read More

David Thomson

Our Clinic Locations

map1

Harley Street Root Canal Clinic
99 Harley Street
London
W1G 6AQ

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0207 224 0999
Email us: CLICK HERE

map2

Richmond Root Canal Clinic
4-6 George Street
Richmond
Surrey TW9 1JY

Contact this Clinic:
Call us: 0208 912 1340
Email us: CLICK HERE

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EndoCare - Root Canal Specialist London - Post

  • Root Canal Treatment

    You may require root canal treatment if you have pain or swelling associalted with your teeth.

  • Root Canal Re-Treatment

    We can help if you are having problems with teeth previously root canal treated by other dentists.

  • Endodontic Microsurgery

    Using the latest surgical techniques we help save teeth even if root canal treatment is not possible.

    • 30 JAN 20

    Going vegan: good for the planet, bad for your teeth?

    If there’s one lifestyle trend that has really taken off in the past few years, it’s veganism. In fact, it’s now estimated that as many as 600,000 people in the UK are following the vegan diet.[i]

    One way that many people get into veganism is by starting with a monthly challenge, such as the increasingly popular Veganuary. First conceived in 2014, this challenge encourages people to become vegan for the month of January, eschewing all meat and animal products in order to lead a healthier lifestyle and cut down their individual impact on the environment and animal life. Since its inception, this movement has inspired more than half a million people to adopt a vegan lifestyle and helped campaign for better vegan options in restaurants and shops to cater for this lifestyle change.[ii]

    In many ways this change makes perfect sense. From an animal cruelty perspective, a meat and animal product inclusive diet is pretty damning, and there are plenty of UK farming practices that don’t put the welfare of the animals first.[iii] The global farming industry is also decidedly detrimental to our environment in some ways (although in the UK it is much better than many other countries), and that’s not even to mention the carbon footprint left by transporting goods and shipping them overseas. There are also some proven health benefits of becoming vegan, namely that those who adopt this style of diet tend to cut out unhealthier food high in fat and sugar and concentrate instead on eating healthy foods such as fresh vegetables and grains. This means they are less likely to be overweight, and therefore escape the increased chances of developing diseases such as cardiovascular disorders and diabetes.[iv]

    However, for all of these benefits, a vegan diet can also cause issues. Research states that in some instances vegan diets could actually encourage higher rates of tooth decay.[v] This is primarily because people following these diets are likely to not consume as much calcium as people who drink milk or eat cheese, and this can quickly lead to teeth having lower defence against plaque acids. Furthermore, a number of prominent foods in the vegan diet are starchy or acidic (grains, fresh fruit) and these can also encourage decay when eaten too regularly.

    As such, it’s important to consider all aspects of your health if you are looking to change your diet in the New Year. There are vegan foods which are high in calcium, including calcium-set tofu, green leafy vegetables and certain seeds – these should be incorporated into the diet to make up any potential calcium deficiency. It’s also a good idea to continue to watch sugar intake –it’s worth noting that some vegan alternative foods and drink for meat and dairy products can have high sugar content or even more calories, such as the sweetened almond milk used by many coffee shops.

    In the end, going vegan is a big choice to make, and you need to ensure that you are making the decision forearmed with knowledge. By exploring healthy ways to incorporate essential nutrients into your diet, there’s no reason that cutting meat and animal products will have a detrimental effect, especially on your dental health. However, it’s something that needs to be considered before making the change.


    [i] The Vegan Society. Statistics. Link: https://www.vegansociety.com/news/media/statistics [Last accessed January 2020].

    [ii] Veganuary. Join the New Years Resolution. Link: https://uk.veganuary.com/ [Last accessed January 2020].

    [iii] The Vegan Society. Statistics. Link: https://www.vegansociety.com/news/media/statistics [Last accessed January 2020].

    [iv] Bupa. Is Going Vegan Good For You? Link: https://www.bupa.co.uk/newsroom/ourviews/veganism-health-fad [Last accessed January 2020].

    [v] The Daily Mail. How A Vegan Diet Can Lead to Tooth Decay. Link: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7541013/Vegan-diet-lead-tooth-decay-warns-leading-dentist.html [Last accessed January 2020].